Learn Spark AR Studio

Everything you need to know to create an interactive augmented reality experience.

Clear
Back

Audio Patches

You can use the Patch Editor to add all kinds of audio effect to your projects.

You'll need to use the audio playback controller and speaker to render sound in your scene first. Once you've does this, you can use:

Audio effect patches are only available in the Beta version of Spark AR Studio. Download it here.

To add an audio patch to your project:

  1. Open the Patch Editor.
  2. Right-click in the Patch Editor to open the menu.
  3. Select an audio effect patch from the menu.

Audio Player, Multi-Clip Controller and Single-Clip Controller

Audio Player

Combine the audio clip in your project and the settings on either the Single or Multi-Clip controller to play audio in your scene.

This patch has 2 input ports:

  1. Audio Clip - connect this to your audio clip.
  2. Controller - connect this to the Single or Multi-Clip controller patch.

The output port, Audio, should be connected to the Audio port of the speaker in your scene.



Multi-Clip Controller

Use this patch to play multiple audio clips at the same time without cutting any of them off.

Connect an Instruction patch, for example Screen Tap, to the input port Play.

The output port, Controller, should be connected to the Audio Player patch.



Single-Clip Controller

Play, stop or loop a single audio clip at a time based on a specific trigger.

Connect an Instruction patch, for example Screen Tap, to one of these ports.

The output port, Controller, should be connected to the Audio Player patch.



Audio effect patches

Connect audio effect patches to audio assets and the audio playback controller, to alter a sound.

Bit Crusher

Add a low-fidelity distortion effect to an audio source. This simulates a low sample rate and low bit resolution rate. For example, you can simulate an 8kHz/6bit signal, while the audio is actually of better quality. Useful for robotic voice sounds.



Patch inputs:

  • Audio - The audio source that you want to alter. Attach to an audio clip, microphone or other audio source.
  • Mix - Blends the audio source signal with the affected signal, measured as a percentage. A value of 0 will pass only the source signal, while a value of 100 will pass only affected signal. Adding some of the source signal with the affected signal can enhance the overall effect due to the clarity of the source signal.
  • Sample Rate - Changes the intensity of the effect by reducing the number of bits for audio samples. A value lower than the source audio's sample rate will start to give a degraded sound. 8,000 will sound like audio through a telephone and below 6,000 will start to give strange low-fi noise. Speech will not recognizable below 4,000.
  • Bits - Simulates number of bits available for each audio sample. The value range is 2 to 16. At lower values, the soft and loud elements of the source signal will be crushed together, resulting in a narrower, crisp sound. Higher values will retain more range between soft and loud elements of the source signal.
  • Bypass - Removes the sound effect from the audio source.

Patch outputs:

  • Audio - Connect to a speaker, an audio effect or another patch that has an audio input.

Denoiser

Remove background noise from an audio source.



Patch inputs:

  • Audio - The audio source that you want to alter. Attach to an audio clip, microphone or other audio source.
  • Amount - Amount of noise removal from the audio source. A value of 100 will reduce the maximum amount of noise from the audio source, while a value of 0 will bypass the effect completely.
  • Bypass - Removes the sound effect from the audio source.

Patch outputs:

  • Audio - Connect to a speaker, an audio effect or another patch that has an audio input.

Distortion

Create a gritty or fuzzy sound effect by adding distortion to an audio source.



Patch inputs:

  • Audio - The audio source that you want to alter. Attach to an audio clip, microphone or other audio source.
  • Drive - Input-amplification that drives the signal into distortion, measured in decibels. The higher the value, the more the signal will be distorted. The value range is 12 to 48.
  • Gain - Output amplification, or master volume applied after the distortion gain, measured in decibels. Use this to make the affected signal quieter or louder without affecting the level of distortion. The value range is 12 to 48.
  • Mix - Blends source audio with affected audio, measured as a percentage. A value of 0 will pass only the source signal, while a value of 100 will pass only affected signal.
  • Bypass - Removes the sound effect from the audio source.

Patch outputs:

  • Audio - Connect to a speaker, an audio effect or another patch that has an audio input.

Modulator

Create an oscillating sound effect with varying pitches. Modulation is often used as an experimental audio effect, and is found in many synthesizers.



Patch inputs:

  • Audio - The audio source that you want to alter. Attach to an audio clip, microphone or other audio source.
  • Frequency - The frequency of the modulator sin wave, in Hz. Accepts values from 20 to 10,000 (Hz), with around 100 resulting in a robotic-sounding effect.
  • Mix - Blends source audio with affected audio, measured as a percentage. A value of 0 will pass only the source signal, while a value of 100 will pass only affected signal. Adding some of the source signal with the affected signal can enhance the overall effect.
  • Bypass - Removes the sound effect from the audio source.

Patch outputs:

  • Audio - Connect to a speaker, an audio effect or another patch that has an audio input.

Pitch Shifter

Change the pitch of an audio source to be deeper or higher. This can be used to create cartoon-style voice effects like a monster or chipmunk.



Patch inputs:

  • Audio - The audio source that you want to alter. Attach to an audio clip, microphone or other audio source.
  • Semitone Adjustment - Pitch shift in musical semitones. A value of -12 halves the pitch, while 12 doubles the pitch. A value of 0 will not change the pitch of the audio source. You can also output microtonal values (fractions of semitones) with decimals.
  • Bypass - Removes the sound effect from the audio source.

Patch outputs:

  • Audio - Connect to a speaker, an audio effect or another patch that has an audio input.

Reverb

Add a sense of space or depth to audio with reverb. You can simulate anything from a tiny box to a large concert hall.



Patch inputs:

  • Audio - The audio source that you want to alter. Attach to an audio clip, microphone or other audio source.
  • Mix - Blend between the source signal ('dry') and the reverb effect. A value of 0 will not add any reverb. A value of 50 will mix the signal 50% dry and 50% reverberation. A value of 100 will result in only reverberation, without any of the source signal. Values of 10-20 are a good place to start.
  • Early Reflections Gain - Loudness control for the early reflections of the reverberation. This can intensify the attack of the reverb. Value range 0 to 100.
  • Diffusion Gain - Loudness control for the reverb decay as it returns to silence.
  • Room Size - Approximates the size of the room you want to simulate in meters from wall to wall. In input of 1 would approximate a 1m closet, while 50 would be a 50m concert hall and 100 would be a large cathedral.
  • Reflectivity - Defines how much of the audio is reflected at each bounce on a wall. Value range: 0 to 100. Low values will simulate softer sounding materials like carpet or curtains. High values will simulate harder materials like wood, glass or metal. A value of 100 will result in self-oscillation and is not recommended.
  • Reflectivity High - Separate value for the reflectivity of high frequencies.
  • Reflectivity Low - Separate value for the reflectivity of low frequencies.
  • Early Reflections - The number of early reflections of reverberation. The value range is 0 to 32.
  • Bypass - Removes the sound effect from the audio source.

Patch outputs:

  • Audio - Connect to a speaker, an audio effect or another patch that has an audio input.

Parametric Equalizer

A three-band parametric equalizer and filter which can be used to shape audio by boosting or cutting areas of frequency.



The first port, Audio, is where you should connect the the audio source that you want to alter. For example, an audio clip, microphone or other audio source.

The Low Type, Mid Type and High Type ports have 7 values to choose from:

  • Bypass: Removes the effect from the audio source.
  • Peak: Passes a narrow band of frequencies and stops all other frequencies.
  • Low Shelf: Increases or reduces frequencies below the shelf frequency value.
  • High Shelf: Increases or reduces frequencies above the shelf frequency value.
  • Low Pass: Passes frequencies lower than the cutoff frequency value and stops frequencies higher than the cutoff frequency value.
  • High Pass: passes frequencies higher than the cutoff frequency value and stops frequencies lower than the cutoff frequency value.
  • Band Pass: Passes frequencies within a certain range.

You can control the type with number values. A value of 0 would by bypass and 1 would be Peak, and so on.

Frequency - The EQ Frequency in relation to the Type. Value range: 0 to 20000 Hz. For example, the cutoff frequency for Low Pass filter or center frequency for Peak filter.

Quality - The quality or steepness of the filter. The value range is 0 to 10.

Gain - The amount of frequency boost or reduction. The value range is -24 to 24 dB.

Patch outputs:

  • Audio - Connect to a speaker, an audio effect or another patch that has an audio input.

Audio Delay

Create a decaying echo effect for an audio source.



Patch inputs:

  • Audio - The audio source that you want to alter. Attach to an audio clip, microphone or other audio source.
  • Active - Switches each echo on or off.
  • Time - Delay of each echo in milliseconds.
  • Feedback - The level that the source audio is fed back into the delay instances. A value of 0 will not cause any feedback. 100 will oscillate endlessly, which isn't recommended.
  • Dry - The volume of the source audio. Maintaining some of the original audio is important to create a mix of source audio and the echos. A value of 0 will not include any of the source audio, while 100 will be the same volume as the source audio. Values over 100 will increase the volume of the source audio signal.
  • Wet - The volume of the delays. There will be equal volume of wet and dry signal if both values are set to the same number. Values over 100 will make the delays louder than the source audio.
  • Bypass - Removes the sound effect from the audio source.

Patch outputs:

  • Audio - Connect to a speaker, an audio effect or another patch that has an audio input.

Join the Spark AR Creator's community

Find inspiration, see examples, get support, and share your work with a network of creators.

Join Community

Frequently asked questions

Have a specific question? Maybe it's been answered.


Read FAQs