Spark AR Studio Frequently Asked Questions

Signing In

Project and Workflow Management

Project Management

Creating New Projects

To make sure that you can get started in Spark AR Studio as quickly as possible, we've made it easy to create a new project. Simply, click New Project on the AR Studio welcome screen.

If you've already moved past the welcome screen, you can:

  1. Click File in the menu bar.
  2. Select New.

Collaboration

When you first save your project, Spark AR Studio creates a project folder on your computer. This folder contains:

  • Every asset you've imported, including objects, textures and your script
  • A project file

If you import assets, this project format lets you and the people you work with edit assets independently at the same time. However, you can't add or remove assets at the same time as somebody else, or save the project file when somebody else is trying to save it.

If an asset is updated externally, it will automatically be updated in AR Studio.

Saving and Sharing Projects

Your project isn't saved automatically. To save it to your computer:

  1. Click File in the menu bar.
  2. Select Save File.
  3. Choose a location on your computer.

Save New Version

Saving a new version won't copy any assets, but it will create a new version of the existing project file. Use this if you want to experiment with a part of your project, but don't want to duplicate everything.

Packaging Projects

If you want to send a version of your project to somebody, you can bundle the project folder and file together to create a package.

To package your project:

  1. Click File in the menu bar.
  2. Select Package....

Saving your project in a shared folder is the best way of collaborating over a period of time, but packaging projects is useful for quick and easy distribution of your work.

Missing Folders and Assets

Missing or invalid project folders

Your project must stay together. This means that project file and any assets you've imported must stay in the folder you created when you first set up your project. If Spark AR Studio can't find the folder that your project is linked to, it will prompt you to find the folder or create a new one.

Assets aren't automatically removed from the project folder if you delete them from Spark AR Studio.

Missing assets

If an asset is moved from the folder, it will no longer be rendered in the project. You'll be alerted that an asset is missing next time you open the .arproj file and the missing asset will be marked with a red symbol.

You'll also be able to search for and replace the asset that has gone missing. To re-open the Missing Assets alert:

  1. Click Project in the menu bar.
  2. Select Show Missing Assets.

Adjusting Asset Alerts

To turn asset alerts on or off:

  1. Click AR Studio in the menu bar.
  2. Select Preference > General.
  3. Check or uncheck the box next to Missing Assets.
Was this article helpful?

Project Management

Creating New Projects

To make sure that you can get started in Spark AR Studio as quickly as possible, we've made it easy to create a new project. Simply, click New Project on the AR Studio welcome screen.

If you've already moved past the welcome screen, you can:

  1. Click File in the menu bar.
  2. Select New.

Collaboration

When you first save your project, Spark AR Studio creates a project folder on your computer. This folder contains:

  • Every asset you've imported, including objects, textures and your script
  • A project file

If you import assets, this project format lets you and the people you work with edit assets independently at the same time. However, you can't add or remove assets at the same time as somebody else, or save the project file when somebody else is trying to save it.

If an asset is updated externally, it will automatically be updated in AR Studio.

Saving and Sharing Projects

Your project isn't saved automatically. To save it to your computer:

  1. Click File in the menu bar.
  2. Select Save File.
  3. Choose a location on your computer.

Save New Version

Saving a new version won't copy any assets, but it will create a new version of the existing project file. Use this if you want to experiment with a part of your project, but don't want to duplicate everything.

Packaging Projects

If you want to send a version of your project to somebody, you can bundle the project folder and file together to create a package.

To package your project:

  1. Click File in the menu bar.
  2. Select Package....

Saving your project in a shared folder is the best way of collaborating over a period of time, but packaging projects is useful for quick and easy distribution of your work.

Missing Folders and Assets

Missing or invalid project folders

Your project must stay together. This means that project file and any assets you've imported must stay in the folder you created when you first set up your project. If Spark AR Studio can't find the folder that your project is linked to, it will prompt you to find the folder or create a new one.

Assets aren't automatically removed from the project folder if you delete them from Spark AR Studio.

Missing assets

If an asset is moved from the folder, it will no longer be rendered in the project. You'll be alerted that an asset is missing next time you open the .arproj file and the missing asset will be marked with a red symbol.

You'll also be able to search for and replace the asset that has gone missing. To re-open the Missing Assets alert:

  1. Click Project in the menu bar.
  2. Select Show Missing Assets.

Adjusting Asset Alerts

To turn asset alerts on or off:

  1. Click AR Studio in the menu bar.
  2. Select Preference > General.
  3. Check or uncheck the box next to Missing Assets.
Was this article helpful?

Project Management

Creating New Projects

To make sure that you can get started in Spark AR Studio as quickly as possible, we've made it easy to create a new project. Simply, click New Project on the AR Studio welcome screen.

If you've already moved past the welcome screen, you can:

  1. Click File in the menu bar.
  2. Select New.

Collaboration

When you first save your project, Spark AR Studio creates a project folder on your computer. This folder contains:

  • Every asset you've imported, including objects, textures and your script
  • A project file

If you import assets, this project format lets you and the people you work with edit assets independently at the same time. However, you can't add or remove assets at the same time as somebody else, or save the project file when somebody else is trying to save it.

If an asset is updated externally, it will automatically be updated in AR Studio.

Saving and Sharing Projects

Your project isn't saved automatically. To save it to your computer:

  1. Click File in the menu bar.
  2. Select Save File.
  3. Choose a location on your computer.

Save New Version

Saving a new version won't copy any assets, but it will create a new version of the existing project file. Use this if you want to experiment with a part of your project, but don't want to duplicate everything.

Packaging Projects

If you want to send a version of your project to somebody, you can bundle the project folder and file together to create a package.

To package your project:

  1. Click File in the menu bar.
  2. Select Package....

Saving your project in a shared folder is the best way of collaborating over a period of time, but packaging projects is useful for quick and easy distribution of your work.

Missing Folders and Assets

Missing or invalid project folders

Your project must stay together. This means that project file and any assets you've imported must stay in the folder you created when you first set up your project. If Spark AR Studio can't find the folder that your project is linked to, it will prompt you to find the folder or create a new one.

Assets aren't automatically removed from the project folder if you delete them from Spark AR Studio.

Missing assets

If an asset is moved from the folder, it will no longer be rendered in the project. You'll be alerted that an asset is missing next time you open the .arproj file and the missing asset will be marked with a red symbol.

You'll also be able to search for and replace the asset that has gone missing. To re-open the Missing Assets alert:

  1. Click Project in the menu bar.
  2. Select Show Missing Assets.

Adjusting Asset Alerts

To turn asset alerts on or off:

  1. Click AR Studio in the menu bar.
  2. Select Preference > General.
  3. Check or uncheck the box next to Missing Assets.
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Keyboard Shortcuts

To help with your workflow, we've included some default keyboard shortcuts in Spark AR Studio. You can edit these, and add your own for other common actions.

Default keyboard shortcuts for Mac

GroupDescriptionShortcut

Edit

Copy

Command + C

Edit

Cut

Command + X

Edit

Duplicate

Command + D

Edit

Find

Command + F

Edit

Paste

Command + V

Edit

Redo

Shift + Command + Z

Edit

Undo

Command + Z

File

Preferences

Command

File

Close

Command + W

File

Undo

Command + Z

File

Save As...

Shift + Command + X

File

New

Command + N

File

Open

Command + O

File

Save

Command + S

Help

Welcome to Spark AR Studio

Shift + Command + W

Project

Edit Properties...

Shift - Command

View

Focus on Selected Objects

F

View

Move Backward

S

View

Move Forward

W

View

Move Left

A

View

Move Right

D

View

Rotate Simulator

Command + Left Arrow Key

View

Show/Hide Asset Summary

Option + Command + A

View

Show/Hide Console

Option + Command + I

View

Show/Hide Patch Editor

Option + Command + P

View

Zoom In

Command +

View

Zoom Out

Command -

Viewport

Pan

Alt + Left Mouse

Viewport

Pan - Alternative

Middle Mouse

Viewport

Rotate

Ctrl + Left Mouse

Viewport

Rotate - Alternative

Right Mouse

Viewport

Zoom

Ctrl + Alt + Left Mouse

Default keyboard shortcuts for Windows

GroupDescriptionShortcut

Edit

Copy

Ctrl + C

Edit

Cut

Ctrl+ X

Edit

Duplicate

Ctrl + D

Edit

Find

Ctrl + F

Edit

Paste

Ctrl + V

Edit

Redo

Ctrl + Y

Edit

Undo

Ctrl + Z

File

Close

Ctrl + F4

File

New

Ctrl + N

File

Open...

Ctrl + O

File

Save...

Ctrl + S

Help

Welcome to Spark AR Studio

Ctrl + Shift + W

Project

Edit Properties...

Ctrl + Shift +,

View

Focus on Selected Objects

F

View

Move Backward

S

View

Move Forward

W

View

Move Left

A

View

Move Right

D

View

Rotate Simulator

Ctrl + Left

View

Show/Hide Asset Summary

Ctrl + Alt + A

View

Show/Hide Console

Ctrl + Alt + I

View

Show/Hide Patch Editor

Ctrl + Alt + P

Viewport

Pan

Alt + Left Mouse

Viewport

Pan + Alternative

Middle Mouse

Viewport

Rotate

Ctrl - Left Mouse

Viewport

Rotate + Alternative

Right Mouse

Viewport

Zoom

Ctrl + Alt + Left Mouse

Adding new shortcuts

To add your own keyboard shortcuts:

  1. Click AR Studio in the menu bar.
  2. Select Preferences > Shortcuts.
  3. Click on the existing shortcut and enter a new one.

Restoring default shortcuts

To revert to the default keyboard shortcuts:

  1. Click AR Studio in the menu bar.
  2. Select Preferences > Shortcuts.
  3. Click Restore Default Settings.
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Assets and Objects

The Face Tracker

The Face Tracker

In Spark AR Studio, use the face tracker to create an effect that responds to or augments someone's face.

When a face tracker is combined with a face mesh, it creates a surface that can detect facial movements and expressions. You can add a material to the face mesh to create a mask effect.

Adding a face tracker

To add a face tracker to your scene:

  1. Click Add Object.
  2. Select Face Tracker.

You'll see an axis tracking the face in the Viewport:

Instructions

If your effect has a face tracker in it, an instruction saying Find a face! will appear until a face is detected by the camera. You can also add custom instructions to effects.

Adding more than one face tracker

To create an effect that can be used by more than one person, you can add more than one face tracker to a scene.

The face tracker texture

You can use the face tracker to create a texture that replicates the face of the person using the effect.

Making objects respond to face movements

Objects that are children of a face tracker will move with the face detected in the scene.

To make an object the child of the face tracker, simply drag the object onto the face tracker in the Scene panel. You can then use the manipulators to adjust its position.

To track objects to precise positions on the face, use face landmark patches.

Properties

When you've selected the face tracker in the Scene panel, you'll see its properties in the Inspector on the right of the interface.

Adjust these properties to make changes to how the face tracker works.

Layer

Click the dropdown next to Layer to adjust which layer the face tracker is assigned to.

Visible

Uncheck the box next to Visible to stop the face tracker and any children from being rendered in the scene.

Tracked face

Choose which face the face tracker will track.

Adjust this property if you're creating an effect with more than one face tracker, to be used by more than one person.

For example, if a face tracker is set to Face 1, it will track the first face to appear in the camera after the effect has been opened.

Transformations

You can't change the position, scale or rotation of a face tracker. This is because these values are controlled by the position of the face detected by the face tracker.

Texture Extraction

Turn the points being tracked on the face into a texture.

Interactions

Insert simple combinations of patches involving the face tracker into the Patch Editor.

Enable For

Choose whether the face tracker and its children are rendered in the front or back camera, or both.

The face tracker patch

You can create a patch representing the face tracker by dragging it from the Scene panel into the Patch Editor.

Three patches will be created:

  • Face Finder - This patch represents the faces detected by the camera.
  • Face Select - This patch can be adjusted to select a specific face from the Face Finder patch.
  • faceTracker0 - The outputs of this patch represent the face being tracked by the face tracker, its 3D Position, Scale and Rotation.

Optimization

Adding multiple face trackers to a scene will have an impact on performance, so it's good idea test your effect as you build it using the Spark AR Player app.

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Tracking More Than One Face

You can add more than one face tracker to a Spark AR Studio project, to create an effect that can be used by more than one person.

Adding a second face tracker

The first face tracker you add will track the first face that appears in the scene.

You'll need to assign a face to every other face tracker you add. To do this:

  1. Select the face tracker in the Scene panel.
  2. In the Inspector, change Tracked face. For example if you've added a second face tracker, you'd change the Tracked face to Face 2.

Adding more face trackers

Each time you add a face tracker, an additional Face will be added to the Tracked face dropdown list.

Assign each new face tracker to a different Face.

Adding more face trackers will have an impact on performance, so it's good idea test your effect as you build it using the Spark AR Player app.

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Visualizing Effects

Navigating the Spark AR Studio Interface

In this guide we'll take a look at the different parts of the Spark AR Studio interface.

The Viewport

This is the middle section of the Spark AR Studio interface. You can see and work with the effect you're building here.

When the Camera is selected in the menu on the left of the screen, blue lines will appear. These lines show where the camera is pointing and which objects are in view of the camera.

In the example above, the pink diamond is a child of the Camera in the Scene panel. It won't be visible on the screen of the device, because its position is outside the blue lines of the camera.

When an object is listed underneath the Camera in the Scene panel, it will move with these blue lines - because it's in camera space. You can test this out by clicking and dragging your mouse in the Simulator.

When an object isn't listed under the camera, it's in what's known as 'world space'. It won't move with these lines, and can be placed in a fixed position in the world. Read more about world effects.

At the top of the Viewport are the Manipulators. Use them to quickly change your object's:

  • Position - to choose where your object is placed within your scene.
  • Scale - to make your object appear bigger or smaller.
  • Rotation - to rotate your object.

Editing objects in the Viewport

3D and 2D objects can be edited in the Viewport. You can change their position, scale and rotation. The default setting is for editing 3D objects. To switch to 2D, click the 2D button in the top right corner:

When this option is:

The Simulator

The Simulator represents a device screen. For example, a mobile or a tablet:

Use it to preview how your effect will look, including with different compression settings. Find out more about using the Simulator.

The Scene panel

Adding objects to the Scene panel on the left of the interface will add them to your effect.

Click Add Object to add an object. You'll see a list of all the different objects included in Spark AR Studio. You can also select 3D Object to import an object from your computer.

This is also where you'd insert an element that will make your effect respond to the person using it, or someone's environment. For example a face tracker if you want to build an effect that responds to someone's face.

You can create relationships between objects in the Scene panel. Creating a child-parent relationship means you can make the same change to multiple objects at the same time, by making a change to the parent object. To create a child-parent relationship, drag the object that you want to be the child onto the object that you want to be the parent.

The Assets panel

This is where you can add your own assets to a project or create assets in Spark AR Studio.

Click Add Assets to create assets or add your own. You can add textures, materials, 3D models, animations and audio files here.

The Inspector

Use the Inspector to make all kinds of changes assets and objects. You'll need to select the asset or object in the Scene panel or Assets panel first.

Below, we've selected one of the mesh that makes up the 3D object in our scene:

We could use the Inspector to change:

  • Which layer it's on, by adjusting the dropdown next to Layer.
  • Whether or not it's visible in the scene, by checking the box next to Visibile.
  • Its position, scale and rotation, by changing the X, Y and X values under Transformations.
  • Its material, by clicking the dropdown under Material.

We could also click Create, next to Patch. This will create a patch representing the mesh in the Patch Editor.

Some properties have arrows next them. This means a patch can be created to represent the property.

So if we click the arrow next to Position, a patch would be added representing the position of the mesh. You could connect this patch to other patches in a graph, to manipulate the position of the mesh.

The Toolbar and Menu bar

The Toolbar

The toolbar is along the left of the interface. Click the icons to:

  • Configure your workspace, for example to show or hide the Patch Editor.
  • Change the video playing in the Viewport.
  • Pause or restart the video.
  • Stop the video. Stopping the video, or pausing and restarting the video, resets your effect to its initial state. Any changes you make when the effect is stopped will be applied when you press play.
  • Test your effect on a device.
  • Export your effect.
  • Report a bug.

The Menu bar

You can access a number of shortcuts and features through the menu bar along the top of the screen. For example, under:

  • File you'll find options to save or export your project
  • Edit you can undo and redo actions.
  • View you can configure your workspace.
  • Insert you can add objects and assets to your project.

The Layers panel

Use this panel to create layers. Find out more about using layers in your effects.

The Patch Editor and Console

Use the Patch Editor to create effects with logic, animation and interactivity, without using scripting. Use the Console to add JavaScript to your project.

To open or close the Patch Editor or console, click to View in the menu bar and select either:

  • Show/Hide Patch Editor.
  • Show/Hide Console.

Both the Patch Editor and Console will open at the bottom of the screen:

Was this article helpful?

Navigating the Spark AR Studio Interface

In this guide we'll take a look at the different parts of the Spark AR Studio interface.

The Viewport

This is the middle section of the Spark AR Studio interface. You can see and work with the effect you're building here.

When the Camera is selected in the menu on the left of the screen, blue lines will appear. These lines show where the camera is pointing and which objects are in view of the camera.

In the example above, the pink diamond is a child of the Camera in the Scene panel. It won't be visible on the screen of the device, because its position is outside the blue lines of the camera.

When an object is listed underneath the Camera in the Scene panel, it will move with these blue lines - because it's in camera space. You can test this out by clicking and dragging your mouse in the Simulator.

When an object isn't listed under the camera, it's in what's known as 'world space'. It won't move with these lines, and can be placed in a fixed position in the world. Read more about world effects.

At the top of the Viewport are the Manipulators. Use them to quickly change your object's:

  • Position - to choose where your object is placed within your scene.
  • Scale - to make your object appear bigger or smaller.
  • Rotation - to rotate your object.

Editing objects in the Viewport

3D and 2D objects can be edited in the Viewport. You can change their position, scale and rotation. The default setting is for editing 3D objects. To switch to 2D, click the 2D button in the top right corner:

When this option is:

The Simulator

The Simulator represents a device screen. For example, a mobile or a tablet:

Use it to preview how your effect will look, including with different compression settings. Find out more about using the Simulator.

The Scene panel

Adding objects to the Scene panel on the left of the interface will add them to your effect.

Click Add Object to add an object. You'll see a list of all the different objects included in Spark AR Studio. You can also select 3D Object to import an object from your computer.

This is also where you'd insert an element that will make your effect respond to the person using it, or someone's environment. For example a face tracker if you want to build an effect that responds to someone's face.

You can create relationships between objects in the Scene panel. Creating a child-parent relationship means you can make the same change to multiple objects at the same time, by making a change to the parent object. To create a child-parent relationship, drag the object that you want to be the child onto the object that you want to be the parent.

The Assets panel

This is where you can add your own assets to a project or create assets in Spark AR Studio.

Click Add Assets to create assets or add your own. You can add textures, materials, 3D models, animations and audio files here.

The Inspector

Use the Inspector to make all kinds of changes assets and objects. You'll need to select the asset or object in the Scene panel or Assets panel first.

Below, we've selected one of the mesh that makes up the 3D object in our scene:

We could use the Inspector to change:

  • Which layer it's on, by adjusting the dropdown next to Layer.
  • Whether or not it's visible in the scene, by checking the box next to Visibile.
  • Its position, scale and rotation, by changing the X, Y and X values under Transformations.
  • Its material, by clicking the dropdown under Material.

We could also click Create, next to Patch. This will create a patch representing the mesh in the Patch Editor.

Some properties have arrows next them. This means a patch can be created to represent the property.

So if we click the arrow next to Position, a patch would be added representing the position of the mesh. You could connect this patch to other patches in a graph, to manipulate the position of the mesh.

The Toolbar and Menu bar

The Toolbar

The toolbar is along the left of the interface. Click the icons to:

  • Configure your workspace, for example to show or hide the Patch Editor.
  • Change the video playing in the Viewport.
  • Pause or restart the video.
  • Stop the video. Stopping the video, or pausing and restarting the video, resets your effect to its initial state. Any changes you make when the effect is stopped will be applied when you press play.
  • Test your effect on a device.
  • Export your effect.
  • Report a bug.

The Menu bar

You can access a number of shortcuts and features through the menu bar along the top of the screen. For example, under:

  • File you'll find options to save or export your project
  • Edit you can undo and redo actions.
  • View you can configure your workspace.
  • Insert you can add objects and assets to your project.

The Layers panel

Use this panel to create layers. Find out more about using layers in your effects.

The Patch Editor and Console

Use the Patch Editor to create effects with logic, animation and interactivity, without using scripting. Use the Console to add JavaScript to your project.

To open or close the Patch Editor or console, click to View in the menu bar and select either:

  • Show/Hide Patch Editor.
  • Show/Hide Console.

Both the Patch Editor and Console will open at the bottom of the screen:

Was this article helpful?

Navigating the Spark AR Studio Interface

In this guide we'll take a look at the different parts of the Spark AR Studio interface.

The Viewport

This is the middle section of the Spark AR Studio interface. You can see and work with the effect you're building here.

When the Camera is selected in the menu on the left of the screen, blue lines will appear. These lines show where the camera is pointing and which objects are in view of the camera.

In the example above, the pink diamond is a child of the Camera in the Scene panel. It won't be visible on the screen of the device, because its position is outside the blue lines of the camera.

When an object is listed underneath the Camera in the Scene panel, it will move with these blue lines - because it's in camera space. You can test this out by clicking and dragging your mouse in the Simulator.

When an object isn't listed under the camera, it's in what's known as 'world space'. It won't move with these lines, and can be placed in a fixed position in the world. Read more about world effects.

At the top of the Viewport are the Manipulators. Use them to quickly change your object's:

  • Position - to choose where your object is placed within your scene.
  • Scale - to make your object appear bigger or smaller.
  • Rotation - to rotate your object.

Editing objects in the Viewport

3D and 2D objects can be edited in the Viewport. You can change their position, scale and rotation. The default setting is for editing 3D objects. To switch to 2D, click the 2D button in the top right corner:

When this option is:

The Simulator

The Simulator represents a device screen. For example, a mobile or a tablet:

Use it to preview how your effect will look, including with different compression settings. Find out more about using the Simulator.

The Scene panel

Adding objects to the Scene panel on the left of the interface will add them to your effect.

Click Add Object to add an object. You'll see a list of all the different objects included in Spark AR Studio. You can also select 3D Object to import an object from your computer.

This is also where you'd insert an element that will make your effect respond to the person using it, or someone's environment. For example a face tracker if you want to build an effect that responds to someone's face.

You can create relationships between objects in the Scene panel. Creating a child-parent relationship means you can make the same change to multiple objects at the same time, by making a change to the parent object. To create a child-parent relationship, drag the object that you want to be the child onto the object that you want to be the parent.

The Assets panel

This is where you can add your own assets to a project or create assets in Spark AR Studio.

Click Add Assets to create assets or add your own. You can add textures, materials, 3D models, animations and audio files here.

The Inspector

Use the Inspector to make all kinds of changes assets and objects. You'll need to select the asset or object in the Scene panel or Assets panel first.

Below, we've selected one of the mesh that makes up the 3D object in our scene:

We could use the Inspector to change:

  • Which layer it's on, by adjusting the dropdown next to Layer.
  • Whether or not it's visible in the scene, by checking the box next to Visibile.
  • Its position, scale and rotation, by changing the X, Y and X values under Transformations.
  • Its material, by clicking the dropdown under Material.

We could also click Create, next to Patch. This will create a patch representing the mesh in the Patch Editor.

Some properties have arrows next them. This means a patch can be created to represent the property.

So if we click the arrow next to Position, a patch would be added representing the position of the mesh. You could connect this patch to other patches in a graph, to manipulate the position of the mesh.

The Toolbar and Menu bar

The Toolbar

The toolbar is along the left of the interface. Click the icons to:

  • Configure your workspace, for example to show or hide the Patch Editor.
  • Change the video playing in the Viewport.
  • Pause or restart the video.
  • Stop the video. Stopping the video, or pausing and restarting the video, resets your effect to its initial state. Any changes you make when the effect is stopped will be applied when you press play.
  • Test your effect on a device.
  • Export your effect.
  • Report a bug.

The Menu bar

You can access a number of shortcuts and features through the menu bar along the top of the screen. For example, under:

  • File you'll find options to save or export your project
  • Edit you can undo and redo actions.
  • View you can configure your workspace.
  • Insert you can add objects and assets to your project.

The Layers panel

Use this panel to create layers. Find out more about using layers in your effects.

The Patch Editor and Console

Use the Patch Editor to create effects with logic, animation and interactivity, without using scripting. Use the Console to add JavaScript to your project.

To open or close the Patch Editor or console, click to View in the menu bar and select either:

  • Show/Hide Patch Editor.
  • Show/Hide Console.

Both the Patch Editor and Console will open at the bottom of the screen:

Was this article helpful?

Mirroring and the Spark AR Player app

Compression and Exporting

Submitting and Sharing Effects

Publishing Effects

After exporting your effect, you'll need to submit it to be published in Spark AR Hub.

The publishing process includes:

Choosing a name for your effect

Effect names must have 20 characters or fewer. This includes numbers, spaces, currency, punctuation and any other symbols.

If the effect is attributed to an Instagram account, the name must not contain the Instagram account, or any variation thereof.

Choosing a platform, owner and publisher

These options control where the effect is published, which account manages the effect and which account the effect is attributed to.

If you publish your effect to both the Facebook and Instagram platforms, you'll only undergo one review process and you'll see combined metrics for your effects

Learn more about choosing a platform, owner and publisher.

Selecting categories and keywords

You'll also need to choose categories for your effect. Categories help people to browse and find effects they'll love.

To help your effect reach the right audience, you can add keywords to it during the submission process.

Adding your demo video and icon

To submit an effect for publishing, you'll need the following assets:

  • A demo video.
  • An icon.

Demo videos show users what to expect when using your effect. The may also be used as part of the review process. On Instagram, demo videos appear in the effect gallery.

In the example below, you'll see how an icon and demo video appears on Instagram.





Publication date

You can choose when you want your effect to become visible, once it's been reviewed and accepted. This won't affect when it gets reviewed.

If you published an effect with location targeting before 29 October 2020 the location you set will still work to limit discovery of the effect. If you update your effect after 29 October location targeting will no longer be supported for this effect.

Submitting and allowing up to 10 days for acceptance

Once your effect is accepted it will be available through all the chosen platforms.

Keep in mind that before people can use your effect it'll be reviewed to make sure it meets:

Take a look at our visual guidelines to make sure your effects are accepted.

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Troubleshooting

Please first check that you are downloading Spark AR Studio from the correct URL.

If you are still having trouble downloading Spark AR Studio make sure your computer meets the minimum system requirements. for Spark AR Studio.

The following hardware does not render Spark AR Studio correctly:

  • Intel HD3000 does not run, OpenGL error.
  • Geforce 920M - does not render correctly.
  • Radeon R7 m360 - does not render correctly.
  • Radeon R5 M330 - does not render correctly.
  • Nvidia GT240 - does not render correctly.
  • Geforce m310m - does not render correctly.

Spark AR Studio for Windows